advertise here Advertise Here! Now accepting applications for your advertisements. Call 515-957-1PIC
Local Businesses preferred.

JENNA With Our Bronze Finish

Posted by Corey Brown July © 2009

Jenna enjoying The out side playing in the Grass...

#

ARIELL

Posted by Corey Brown July © 2009

This is one of many great photos we got from Our Senior session with Ariell

#

An IOWA Sunset

Posted by Corey Brown July © 2009

#

Chicago Sky Line

Posted by Corey Brown June © 2009

Chicago the City of Wind. Chicago is a very beautiful city as long as you take a step back from the hustle and bustle. This is only a partial of a skyline shot that was done for a commercial sub shop. The final print will be close to 14 feet wide, as soon as it is hung I encourage you to check it out.

#

DRAMA

Posted by Corey Brown July © 2009

#

My White Snow is Gray!

Posted by Corey Brown On 7:37 PM
Have you ever tried taking some landscape and winter scenery photographs just to have them all come out dark and gray or blue. Snow Open River I know I have and I can tell you what causes that and better yet how to fix it. So what exactly causes the photo above to be dark and gray? It is a mixture of a couple of things. The first is how the camera meters the lighting. Since the snow is bright white the camera is thinking this is a light source and then adjusts the camera to expose as if the snow is a huge light. Now that explains why it is under exposed and it can also explain why the color can be off by so much. In a lot of P&S cameras and base DSLR's there is a snow setting which compensates for the exposure as well as the white balance. I know most people think well the snow is white how hard should it be for the camera to tell that. Snow Open River Well the camera sees things a little differently then we and our eyes do. One thing is our eyes and brain automatically WB correct. The next is a camera is always trying to balance to 18% gray. Now this is where we come up with either blue, gray, or some other off color pictures and it will vary from camera to camera and the settings you are trying to photograph. Some cameras will see things literally. So on a clear day the camera will see the blue reflecting off the snow. Thus allowing your photo to have a blue tint to it. Realistically taking pictures in snow can be some of the most challenging situations for a camera. The first thing to do if you realize by reviewing your photos that they are dark or if your camera has a histogram and it is bunched up to the left is to add exposure. Once again this will vary from camera to camera but it is not uncommon to have to add +1EV to get a proper exposure. As for WB this will depend on if the sky is clear or over cast or a mixture. However, a good rule of thumb is in between 5500k to 6500k that should be your daylight and shade or cloudy WB. So do not be afraid to take control of your photos and change things. Auto on the camera is not always right and some times it is just way wrong. So it is always a good idea to slow down take your time and make sure you get as much right in camera vs trying to fix it later and losing so much of your quality and detail. I hope you find this helpful and as always feel free to leave your comments and feedback Thanks and God Bless Corey Brown (Glory 2 Jesus 4 Photography)

0 Response to ";My White Snow is Gray!";

Recent Photos

    Learn Light

    Contributors